Concentrations of energy substrates in oviduct fluid in unilaterally ovariectomised pigs

Citation
R. Nichol et al., Concentrations of energy substrates in oviduct fluid in unilaterally ovariectomised pigs, RES VET SCI, 65(3), 1998, pp. 263-264
Citations number
17
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Veterinary Medicine/Animal Health
Journal title
RESEARCH IN VETERINARY SCIENCE
ISSN journal
0034-5288 → ACNP
Volume
65
Issue
3
Year of publication
1998
Pages
263 - 264
Database
ISI
SICI code
0034-5288(199811/12)65:3<263:COESIO>2.0.ZU;2-3
Abstract
Nichol et al (1992, Journal of Reproduction and Fertility, 96, 699-707) ide ntified a pre- to post-ovulatory decrease (approx 1mM) in the amount of glu cose in pig oviduct fluid. The present studies investigated whether the dec rease was due to metabolism by embroyos and/or oviduct tissues, and also wh ether there was a local influence of the ovary on the oviduct fluid content of energy substrates. Unilaterally ovariectomised pigs were used, in which , through compensation, oviducts that contained twice the normal number of embryos could be compared with oviducts which contained no embryos. Followi ng unilateral ovariectomy and after two oestrous cycles of normal duration, surgery was performed 88 hours after the beginning of standing heat to obt ain oviduct fluid samples, just before embryonic entry into the uterus. Lum inal fluid samples from the ampulla and ampullary-isthmic junction from ovi ducts with and without an adjacent ovary were assayed for glucose, pyruvate and lactate concentrations. No significant differences were found between the glucose, pyruvate and lactate concentrations in fluids from the ampulla or ampullary-isthmic junction from oviducts containing embryos compared wi th absence of embryos (P > 0.05). Therefore, the post-ovulatory decrease wa s not due to the presence of embryos or to a local effect of the ipsilatera l ovary. Consequently, pig oviduct fluid concentrations of glucose, lactate and pyruvate are seemingly regulated by systemic mechanisms.