MULTIPLE PATERNITY IN BROODS OF AQUATIC W ARBLERS ACROCEPHALUS-PALUDICOLA - 1ST RESULTS OF A DNA-FINGERPRINTING STUDY

Citation
K. Schulzehagen et al., MULTIPLE PATERNITY IN BROODS OF AQUATIC W ARBLERS ACROCEPHALUS-PALUDICOLA - 1ST RESULTS OF A DNA-FINGERPRINTING STUDY, Journal fur Ornithologie, 134(2), 1993, pp. 145-154
Citations number
34
Language
TEDESCO
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Ornithology
Journal title
ISSN journal
0021-8375
Volume
134
Issue
2
Year of publication
1993
Pages
145 - 154
Database
ISI
SICI code
0021-8375(1993)134:2<145:MPIBOA>2.0.ZU;2-2
Abstract
Female Aquatic Warblers always care alone for their broods, whereas ma les are obviously emancipated from any duties. Prerequisite for the un iparental care of the nestlings is the high abundance of arthropods in the Carex vegetation inhabited by Aquatic Warblers. Both sexes strive for copulations with several partners. The reproductive success of th e males, which advertize constantly throughout the entire breeding sea son, was analyzed in this study by DNA-fingerprinting. Blood samples w ere collected in 1990 in a study plot on the Biebrza marshes/NE-Poland from 70 nestlings of 18 broods, their respective mothers and 32 males . DNA-fingerprint analysis was performed with synthetic multilocus pro bes ([CAC]5 or [GAA]5) and immunological methods (anti-digoxigenin ant ibodies coupled to phosphatase) were employed to visualize hybridized DNA bands. Analyzing 70 nestlings, intraspecific nestparasitism could not be detected in any case, i.e. the female feeding at a nest was alw ays the corresponding mother. Nine of 18 broods originated from one si ngle father, while the other nine broads had two to four fathers respe ctively. Multiple paternity occurred in all broods with five and six n estlings, whereas we found single paternity exclusively in broods with two to four nestlings (p < 0.01; Fisher's exact test). In most broods with multiple paternity the involved males fathered only just one nes tling. The degree of multiple paternity in Aquatic Warbler broods was very high: 58 % of nestlings origined from multiple paternity broods a nd 44 % of all broods were fathered by 3 or even 4 males. Taking all n estlings into account, the 'extra-pair' paternity rate was 36 %.