CLONAL STRUCTURE, GENOTYPIC DIVERSITY, AND SEED PRODUCTION IN POPULATIONS OF FILIPENDULA-RUBRA (ROSACEAE) FROM THE NORTHCENTRAL UNITED-STATES

Citation
N. Aspinwall et T. Christian, CLONAL STRUCTURE, GENOTYPIC DIVERSITY, AND SEED PRODUCTION IN POPULATIONS OF FILIPENDULA-RUBRA (ROSACEAE) FROM THE NORTHCENTRAL UNITED-STATES, American journal of botany, 79(3), 1992, pp. 294-299
Citations number
21
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Journal title
ISSN journal
0002-9122
Volume
79
Issue
3
Year of publication
1992
Pages
294 - 299
Database
ISI
SICI code
0002-9122(1992)79:3<294:CSGDAS>2.0.ZU;2-2
Abstract
Queen of the prairie, Filipendula rubra (Rosaceae), is a clonal plant species inhabiting calcareous fens and wet meadows of the northcentral United States. F. rubra reproduces asexually by underground rhizomes and sexually by seed. While many studies have explored genotype divers ity in clonal species with limited sexual reproduction, fewer have bee n conducted on clonal species with the potential for extensive sexual reproduction. We studied the relationship between the extent of sexual reproduction and genotype diversity. Although genotype diversity in F . rubra was double that reported by others for 27 nearly obligate clon al plant species, it was still quite low. For 25 populations studied, the mean number of genotypes was 5.5 (range = 1-15; SE = 0.964) and th e average proportion of distinguishable genotypes was 0.38 (range = 0. 03-1.00; SE = 0.07). The production of viable seed was quite variable among populations (mean proportion of viable seeds = 0.242; range = 0. 002-0.565; SE = 0.04). Considering that some inflorescences can produc e over 5,000 seeds, the potential for recruitment of sexually produced individuals is very large. No correlation was found between seed prod uction and genotype diversity as was expected in a self-incompatible s pecies in which one-third of the populations possessed a single genoty pe. It was hypothesized that the low genotype diversity found in numer ous populations may be due to competition limiting recruitment of new seedlings.