EFFECTS OF MICROBIAL PHYTASE SUPPLEMENTATION OF A BARLEY-SOYBEAN MEALDIET ON THE PERFORMANCE AND BONE MINERALIZATION OF GROWING-FINISHING PIGS

Authors
Citation
E. Helander, EFFECTS OF MICROBIAL PHYTASE SUPPLEMENTATION OF A BARLEY-SOYBEAN MEALDIET ON THE PERFORMANCE AND BONE MINERALIZATION OF GROWING-FINISHING PIGS, Agricultural science in Finland, 3(5), 1994, pp. 439-448
Citations number
NO
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
AgricultureEconomics & Policy",Agriculture,"Agriculture Dairy & AnumalScience","Food Science & Tenology
ISSN journal
0789-600X
Volume
3
Issue
5
Year of publication
1994
Pages
439 - 448
Database
ISI
SICI code
0789-600X(1994)3:5<439:EOMPSO>2.0.ZU;2-A
Abstract
The study evaluated the effect of a phytase supplement, produced by As pergillus niger, on the performance of 72 growing-finishing pigs (28-1 01 kg). Chemical and physical parameters of the tibia and fibula bones were measured. The control diet (diet 1) was formulated to be adequat e for pigs with respect to all nutrients, and diets 2 and 3 with respe ct to all other nutrients except total phosphorus (P). The P source of the control diet was dicalciumphosphate (dihydrate), while no inorgan ic P was added to diets 2 and 3. Diet 3 was supplemented with phytase, 720 U/kg feed. The average daily gain (ADG) and the feed conversion r atio (FCR) of the control pigs were significantly better than those of the groups without inorganic P. Phytase improved the ADG (p < 0.01) a nd the FCR during the first 45 days (28-60 kg). The pigs on diet 2 wer e able to grow as well as the other pigs when they became heavier (bet ween 60-100 kg), so that at the end of the trial there was no signific ant difference between diets 2 and 3 for these parameters. No signs of leg weakness were observed in the growing pigs on any of the diets. T he density (p < 0.01) and the breaking strength (p < 0.01) of the tibi a bone were reduced (p < 0.01) on low-P diets compared to control diet . Phytase supplementation improved the density of the tibia bone (p < 0.001) compared to diet 2 and tended to improve the breaking strength, but the difference was not significant. No differences were found in the ash or P contents of the fibula bones. Phosphorus emissions were m arkedly reduced on diets 2 and 3. On the basis of the results it is no t possible to recommend to replace inorganic P totally by phytase in g rowing-finishing pigs on barley-SBM diets.