ELECTROCARDIOGRAPHIC ABNORMALITIES AND 30-YEAR MORTALITY AMONG WHITE AND BLACK-MEN OF THE CHARLESTON HEART-STUDY

Citation
Se. Sutherland et al., ELECTROCARDIOGRAPHIC ABNORMALITIES AND 30-YEAR MORTALITY AMONG WHITE AND BLACK-MEN OF THE CHARLESTON HEART-STUDY, Circulation, 88(6), 1993, pp. 2685-2692
Citations number
12
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Cardiac & Cardiovascular System",Hematology
Journal title
ISSN journal
0009-7322
Volume
88
Issue
6
Year of publication
1993
Pages
2685 - 2692
Database
ISI
SICI code
0009-7322(1993)88:6<2685:EAA3MA>2.0.ZU;2-4
Abstract
Background. The long-term predictive significance of a single ECG trac ing for mortality was explored among the white and black men of the Ch arleston Heart Study. Methods and Results. The 1960 baseline tracings of men ages 35 to 74 in the Charleston Heart Study cohort were coded a ccording to the Minnesota classification. Tracings were categorized as being normal or having minor or major abnormalities. The 30-year vita l status was ascertained for the cohort, and the association between E CG findings and coronary and all-cause mortality was evaluated. The pr oportion of black men with major abnormalities at the 1960 baseline ex amination was almost twice that of white men. Rates of all-cause morta lity increased with severity of abnormalities for white and black men. The absolute excess risk for black men with major abnormalities was 2 3.3 per 1000 person-years and 12.8 for white men. The excess risk for coronary mortality was 7.3 for white men and 6.5 for black men. Conclu sions. Many of the findings in this study confirm earlier associations derived from studies of white populations and extend the observations to black men. However, the magnitude of the relative risk for mortali ty was different for white and black men. After controlling for tradit ional coronary disease risk factors and minor abnormalities, white men with major abnormalities were 2.72 (95% confidence interval, 1.47, 5. 04) times more likely to die of coronary disease compared with black m en, who were 1.95 (95% confidence interval, 0.93, 4.11) times more lik ely to die of coronary disease.