ADAPTATION TO REPEATED RESTRAINT STRESS IN RATS - FAILURE OF ETHANOL-TREATED RATS TO ADAPT IN THE STRESS SCHEDULE

Authors
Citation
Dj. Haleem, ADAPTATION TO REPEATED RESTRAINT STRESS IN RATS - FAILURE OF ETHANOL-TREATED RATS TO ADAPT IN THE STRESS SCHEDULE, Alcohol and alcoholism, 31(5), 1996, pp. 471-477
Citations number
25
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Substance Abuse
Journal title
ISSN journal
0735-0414
Volume
31
Issue
5
Year of publication
1996
Pages
471 - 477
Database
ISI
SICI code
0735-0414(1996)31:5<471:ATRRSI>2.0.ZU;2-2
Abstract
Adaptation to a repeated restraint stress schedule was monitored in et hanol-treated and control rats. A single episode of 2 h restraint decr eased food intake in both control and ethanol-treated rats. The decrea ses in control rats were not observed following the 5th daily restrain t of 2 h/day, suggesting that adaptation has occurred. Ethanol-treated rats, however, exhibited decreased food intake even after 5th daily r estraint of 2 h/day. Ethanol administration decreased weekly but not d aily cumulative food intake in unrestrained rats. Food intakes of etha nol-treated and control restrained rats were comparable following 1st- 3rd daily restraints, but were smaller in ethanol-treated rats followi ng the 4th and 5th daily restraints. Open-field ambulatory activities monitored 24 h after the 5th daily restraint on the 6th day were compa rable in control restrained and unrestrained rats. Ethanol-treated and control unrestrained rats also exhibited comparable ambulation, but e thanol-treated restrained rats exhibited smaller activity than control restrained or ethanol-treated unrestrained rats. Fluid intakes of eth anol and control rats were comparable during the 2 weeks of ethanol ad ministration, but daily restraint schedule decreased ethanol intake. T he findings show adaptation to repeated restraint in control rats and inability of ethanol-treated rats to adapt in the stress schedule. The se findings imply that excessive alcohol consumption may impair adapta tion to stress and thus conceivably precipitate depression.