SYNAPTIC MEMBRANE RESPONSES TO ACUTE AND CHRONIC ALCOHOL-INTOXICATIONIN HIGH ALCOHOL SENSITIVE (HAS) AND LOW ALCOHOL SENSITIVE (LAS) SELECTIVELY BRED RATS

Citation
F. Beauge et al., SYNAPTIC MEMBRANE RESPONSES TO ACUTE AND CHRONIC ALCOHOL-INTOXICATIONIN HIGH ALCOHOL SENSITIVE (HAS) AND LOW ALCOHOL SENSITIVE (LAS) SELECTIVELY BRED RATS, Alcohol and alcoholism, 29(6), 1994, pp. 745-750
Citations number
27
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Substance Abuse
Journal title
ISSN journal
0735-0414
Volume
29
Issue
6
Year of publication
1994
Pages
745 - 750
Database
ISI
SICI code
0735-0414(1994)29:6<745:SMRTAA>2.0.ZU;2-6
Abstract
HAS (high alcohol sensitive) and LAS (low alcohol sensitive) lines of rats have been selectively bred based on their differences in ethanol- induced sleep time. In the present study, the two lines were compared to examine another central effect of acute alcohol intoxication: namel y, hypothermia. As the disturbances in membrane microorganization have been associated with the nervous system's sensitivity and tolerance t o ethanol, the synaptic plasma membrane fluidity and acute sensitivity to ethanol were also evaluated by fluorescence polarization of DPH pr obes in the HAS and LAS rats. The two lines did not differ in the magn itude of their hypothermic response after acute injection of ethanol ( 3 g/kg body wt, i.p.). Although membranes in the HAS line were slightl y more rigid than in the LAS line, the level of membrane disordering a fter acute ethanol addition was identical for the two lines in the reg ion examined with the DPH probe. Following the chronic intoxication of the rats, the two lines developed tolerance to the hypnotic and hypot hermic effects of ethanol. In the same way, a membrane resistance (i.e . tolerance) to the disordering effect of acute ethanol addition devel oped in the region probed with DPH. In general, the LAS line showed a more pronounced level of tolerance than the HAS line at both the funct ional and membrane level. These results suggest that different measure s used to assess the depressant action of ethanol, such as sleep time, hypothermia or membrane disordering, may not be related and could ind icate different genetic origins. They also show that several independe nt mechanisms besides simple adaptation to the acute effects of ethano l may contribute to tolerance to these effects.