SKIN THICKNESS, ESTROGEN USE, AND BONE MASS IN OLDER WOMEN

Citation
Dc. Bauer et al., SKIN THICKNESS, ESTROGEN USE, AND BONE MASS IN OLDER WOMEN, Menopause, 1(3), 1994, pp. 131-136
Citations number
30
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Obsetric & Gynecology","Reproductive Biology
Journal title
Menopause → ACNP
ISSN journal
1072-3714
Volume
1
Issue
3
Year of publication
1994
Pages
131 - 136
Database
ISI
SICI code
1072-3714(1994)1:3<131:STEUAB>2.0.ZU;2-H
Abstract
To test the hypothesis that estrogen replacement therapy preserves ski n thickness, and to determine the relationship between bone mass and s kin thickness, we performed a cross-sectional analysis of baseline dat a collected for a multicenter prospective study of osteoporotic fractu res. 1,072 ambulatory nonblack women aged 65 years or older were recru ited from population-based listings at two US clinical centers. Demogr aphic and historical information and anthropometric measurements were obtained from a baseline questionnaire, interview, and examination. Es trogen use was assessed by questionnaire and interview. Skin thickness was measured over the middle metacarpophalangeal joint with mechanica l calipers. Bone mass was measured by single photon absorptiometry at three appendicular sites: the distal and midradius, and the calcaneus. After adjusting for other potential confounding factors, each 10 year s of age was associated with an 8.6% reduction in skin thickness, and every 5-kg/m(2) increase in body mass index was associated with a 3.8% increase in skin thickness. Smokers had thinner skin than nonsmokers. Estrogen users had thinner skin; compared to never-users, current use rs had a 5.1% reduction in skin thickness, and past users had a 2.0% r eduction in skin thickness. Among estrogen users, every 10 years of us e was associated with a 1.7% reduction in skin thickness. Skin thickne ss was weakly associated with bone mass of the middle radius and calca neus, but not the distal radius. We found no evidence that estrogen pr eserves skin thickness; indeed, estrogen use is associated with thinne r skin. Although skin thickness and bone mass are related, the associa tion is too weak to be useful for predicting bone mass.