INCIDENCE OF INFLAMMATORY BOWEL-DISEASE IN ITALY - A NATIONWIDE POPULATION-BASED STUDY

Citation
A. Tragnone et al., INCIDENCE OF INFLAMMATORY BOWEL-DISEASE IN ITALY - A NATIONWIDE POPULATION-BASED STUDY, International journal of epidemiology, 25(5), 1996, pp. 1044-1052
Citations number
59
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Public, Environmental & Occupation Heath
ISSN journal
0300-5771
Volume
25
Issue
5
Year of publication
1996
Pages
1044 - 1052
Database
ISI
SICI code
0300-5771(1996)25:5<1044:IOIBII>2.0.ZU;2-B
Abstract
Background The epidemiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in Sou thern Europe is still unclear, Sporadic reports suggest a lower incide nce of IBD in Italy than in other Western Countries and the USA. Metho ds. A nationwide population-based study was carried out to estimate IB D incidence rates in eight Italian cities. All new cases of IBD diagno sed over 4 years in the target populations were collected from multipl e information sources. Results. From 1989 to 1992, 509 ulcerative coli tis (UC), 222 Crohn's disease (CD) and 10 undefined IBD cases were col lected, giving age-adjusted incidence rates (per 100 000 per year) of 5.2 for UC and 2.3 for CD. Using the capture-recapture method, an esti mated completeness of 0.81 was obtained for case archives, without app reciable and significant differences between areas. The rates computed after correcting underestimation were 6.8 for UC and 2.8 for CD. The sex ratio M/F was 1.7 for UC and 1.0 for CD. The highest age-specific incidence rates were between 30 and 39 years for UC and between 20 and 29 years for CD.Conclusions. The incidence rate of CD in Italy is hom ogeneous between the cities investigated and lower than those reported for other Mediterranean countries. In contrast, the UC incidence rate is within the range of those reported in European studies. A wide var iability in the UC rates between the cities was also observed, These r esults could be related to different environmental factors or the gene tic background of the populations, or both.