SCANNING PROBE MICROSCOPY FOR 2-D SEMICONDUCTOR DOPANT PROFILING AND DEVICE FAILURE ANALYSIS

Citation
Ak. Henning et T. Hochwitz, SCANNING PROBE MICROSCOPY FOR 2-D SEMICONDUCTOR DOPANT PROFILING AND DEVICE FAILURE ANALYSIS, Materials science & engineering. B, Solid-state materials for advanced technology, 42(1-3), 1996, pp. 88-98
Citations number
33
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Material Science","Physics, Condensed Matter
ISSN journal
0921-5107
Volume
42
Issue
1-3
Year of publication
1996
Pages
88 - 98
Database
ISI
SICI code
0921-5107(1996)42:1-3<88:SPMF2S>2.0.ZU;2-Y
Abstract
We have extended the capabilities of an atomic force microscope (AFM) with double heterodyne force detection, to include both electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) and scanning differential capacitance microscop y (SdCM). Samples measured with this tool are imaged simultaneously in each of these three modes. Inhomogeneities in surface topography (AFM ), surface work function (EFM) and sub-surface charge (SdCM) are thus detected at once. We work in non-contact mode in order to interact non -destructively with our samples, with resultant lateral spatial resolu tion of 25-50 nm. Variations in surface topography of less than 1 nm, and surface potential variations as small as 1 mV, are imaged easily. Wi: have applied the techniques based on this tool to microfabricated materials and device structures. In particular, we have studied the me tal-oxide-silicon field-effect transistor (MOSFET) structure. of impor tance to microelectronic science and engineering. Following a brief de scription of our detection system, this work will describe our measure ments of dopant profiles related to this structure. It will also demon strate our ground-breaking application of scanned probe techniques to the analysis of other materials defects, and of device failure? in the se structures. The work will conclude with a quantitative discussion o f the three most limiting factors for our techniques: parasitic capaci tance; convolved signals; and large-signal behavior of the cantilever.