LESIONS IN THE BED NUCLEUS OF THE STRIA TERMINALIS, BUT NOT IN THE LATERAL SEPTUM, INHIBIT SHORT-PHOTOPERIOD-INDUCED TESTICULAR REGRESSION IN SYRIAN-HAMSTERS

Citation
Mn. Raitiere et al., LESIONS IN THE BED NUCLEUS OF THE STRIA TERMINALIS, BUT NOT IN THE LATERAL SEPTUM, INHIBIT SHORT-PHOTOPERIOD-INDUCED TESTICULAR REGRESSION IN SYRIAN-HAMSTERS, Brain research, 705(1-2), 1995, pp. 159-167
Citations number
45
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Neurosciences
Journal title
ISSN journal
0006-8993
Volume
705
Issue
1-2
Year of publication
1995
Pages
159 - 167
Database
ISI
SICI code
0006-8993(1995)705:1-2<159:LITBNO>2.0.ZU;2-S
Abstract
The transfer of adult male hamsters from long days (LD) to short days (SD)(i.e. < 12 h of light per day) typically results in marked testicu lar regression and a decline in plasma testosterone concentrations. To help disclose key brain regions responsible for mediating this photop eriodic response male hamsters received either chemical (i.e. N-methyl -D-aspartate; NMDA) or radiofrequency current lesions in the bed nucle us of the stria terminalis (BNST), and were then exposed to SD for 15 or 12 weeks, respectively. Although body weights were similar between sham-lesioned controls and the NMDA-lesioned hamsters, the latter show ed a significant attenuation of testicular regression; additionally, t heir plasma testosterone concentrations remained at typical LD levels. When radiofrequency current-lesioned hamsters were transferred from L D to SD they also failed to show significant signs of testicular regre ssion, nor a decline in plasma testosterone concentrations, nor a comp lete arrest of spermatogenesis. In contrast, sham-lesioned controls or hamsters that were lesioned dorsally to the BNST at a site primarily involving the lateral septum all showed the expected degree of testicu lar regression, a decline in plasma testosterone concentrations, and c omplete arrest of spermatogenesis; body weights were similar in all of the experimental group. Taken together, these findings suggest that t he BNST, a brain area traditionally not associated with reproductive f unction, may play an important role in mediating photoperiodic informa tion to the neural circuits that control the reproductive axis.