COFFEE AND TEA INTAKE AND RISK OF CANCERS OF THE COLON AND RECTUM - ASTUDY OF 3,530 CASES AND 7,057 CONTROLS

Citation
A. Tavani et al., COFFEE AND TEA INTAKE AND RISK OF CANCERS OF THE COLON AND RECTUM - ASTUDY OF 3,530 CASES AND 7,057 CONTROLS, International journal of cancer, 73(2), 1997, pp. 193-197
Citations number
24
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Oncology
ISSN journal
0020-7136
Volume
73
Issue
2
Year of publication
1997
Pages
193 - 197
Database
ISI
SICI code
0020-7136(1997)73:2<193:CATIAR>2.0.ZU;2-S
Abstract
The relationship between coffee, decaffeinated coffee and tea intake a nd risk of cancers of the colon and rectum was considered combining da ta from 2 case-control studies, one conducted between 1985 and 1991 in Northern Italy and the other between 1991 and 1996 in 6 Italian cente rs. Cases were patients below age 80, with histologically confirmed ca ncer of the colon (n = 2,166) or rectum (n = 1,364), and controls were 7,057 patients admitted to hospital for a wide spectrum of acute, non -neoplastic, non-digestive tract diseases. Compared with coffee non-dr inkers, the risk of colon cancer was reduced in drinkers of 4 or more cups/day [multivariate odds ratios (ORs) 0.73; 95% confidence interval s 0.60-0.89), with a significant trend in risk with dose; no significa nt association emerged between coffee drinking and risk of rectal canc er (OR 1.00 for drinkers of 4 or more cups/day). Decaffeinated coffee was consumed in small amounts by about 4% of cases and controls and th e OR was 0.92 for colon and 0.88 for rectal cancers. Tea consumption w as generally limited to 1 cup/day or to occasional intake and did not substantially modify the risk of colon and rectal cancers. No signific ant heterogeneity was found for the inverse relationship between coffe e intake and colon cancer risk across strata of age at diagnosis, sex, smoking status, total alcohol and meat and vegetable intake, while th e protection of coffee was stronger in people eating 3 or more meals/d ay. Thus, our results confirm that coffee intake has a quantifiable pr otective effect on colon cancer risk. (C) 1997 Wiley-Liss, Inc.